Clinical and anatomical features of lymphosarcoma in ...

Description

Citation

Title Clinical and anatomical features of lymphosarcoma in 118 cats
Author(s) L. J. Gabor, R. Malik, P. J. Canfield
Journal Australian Veterinary Journal
Date 1998
Volume 76
Issue 11
Start page 725
End page 732
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine patients' characteristics and anatomical distribution of lesions in cats with lymphosarcoma. DESIGN: Prospective multi-institutional study of naturally occurring feline lymphosarcoma. METHODS: Veterinarians in Sydney were provided with free diagnostic laboratory services for suspect cases of feline lymphosarcoma. Lymphosarcoma was diagnosed based on physical findings, radiographic and/or ultrasonographic images and results of cytological or histopathological examination. When owners were not interested in pursuing an antemortem diagnosis, suspect cases were collected for necropsy. Patients' characteristics and physical findings were recorded. A modified scheme for anatomical classification of lesions was devised including a 'mixed' category for cases which involved two or more anatomical forms. RESULTS: One hundred and eighteen cases were accrued over an 18 month period. The median age was 120 months and range 5 to 212 months. Age distribution was bimodal, with a small peak for cats less than 24 months, and a normal distribution centred on 97 to 120 months. Eighty cats were domestic crossbreds, 22 were Siamese or Oriental cats (including crosses), 6 were Burmese, 5 were purebred longhairs and the remaining 5 were one of a number of purebred shorthaired breeds. In comparison to 1017 consecutive cases admitted to our hospital for conditions other than lymphosarcoma, Siamese/Oriental cats were over-represented amongst lymphosarcoma cases (P = 0.0006). Male cats were also over-represented, accounting for 72 of 118 cases (P = 0.05). Abdominal lymphosarcoma was the most common anatomical form (43 cats), followed by mixed (39), nodal (20), mediastinal (9) and atypical (involving non-lymphoid organs, 7) forms. When analysed for specific organ involvement, 29 (25%) had mediastinal involvement, 71 (60%) had abdominal involvement including 60 (51%) with involvement of the intestinal tract and/or mesenteric lymph nodes and 36 (31%) with bilateral renal involvement, and 47 (40%) had peripheral lymph node involvement. No case of primary lymphoid leukaemia was identified. A noticeable subgroup of cats younger than 24 months had involvement of the anterior mediastinum with or without concurrent enlargement of cervical or axillary lymph nodes; Siamese/Oriental cats were over-represented in this subgroup. Among cases with nodal involvement, lymph nodes of the head and neck were frequently involved, mandibular nodes most commonly, followed by superficial cervical nodes. In seven cases a solitary node was affected. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with similar surveys overseas, our cats were older and male cats were over-represented. There was a notable subgroup of young cats with mediastinal involvement. Siamese/Oriental cats were over-represented in this subgroup as well as in the larger population of cats with lymphosarcoma. Compared with overseas surveys, renal involvement, mixed cases and atypical cases (including nasal lymphosarcoma) were more common. A new subcategory of nodal lymphosarcoma, with involvement restricted to node(s) of head and neck, was identified.

Using APA 6th Edition citation style.

[Page generation failure. The bibliography processor requires a browser with Javascript enabled.]

Times viewed: 190

Adding this citation to "My List" will allow you to export this citation in other styles.