Pathogenesis of rotavirus infection in various age ...

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Title Pathogenesis of rotavirus infection in various age groups of chickens and turkeys: pathology
Author(s) Carmencita V. Yason, B. A. Summers, K. A. Schat
Journal American Journal of Veterinary Research
Date 1987
Volume 48
Issue 6
Start page 927
End page 938
Abstract Various age groups of turkeys, White Leghorn chickens, and broiler chickens were inoculated with turkey rotavirus strain Tu-2 or with chicken rotavirus Ch-2, and the development of rotavirus-induced lesions were evaluated macroscopically and microscopically (light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). Morphometric evaluations were conducted to determine morphologic changes in the villi of infected turkeys. Macroscopic lesions that were found in turkeys, but not in chickens, consisted of pallor of the intestinal tract and distension of the cecum with frothy or nonfrothy fluid contents. Histologic lesions in turkeys consisted of basal vacuolation of enterocytes, separation of enterocytes from the lamina propria (with subsequent desquamation), villus atrophy accompanied by widening of the lamina propria, scalloping of the villus surface, fusion of the villi, and leukocytic infiltration of the lamina propria. Scanning electron microscopy indicated roughened villus surfaces, distortion of the normal morphologic features of the villi, and loss of microvilli in cells located on the tips of the villi. Most of the lesions disappeared by 8 days after inoculation. Results of the morphometric evaluations indicated that the crypt length had increased and the villus-to-crypt ratio had significantly decreased, compared with that of noninoculated control turkeys. Broilers greater than or equal to 21 days old and White Leghorn chickens greater than or equal to 35 days old had minimal leukocytic infiltration of the lamina propria and minimal loss of microvilli in cells located on the tips of the villi. The loss of microvilli was more extensive in chickens greater than or equal to 119 days old than in younger birds. Generally, turkeys 1 to 112 days old developed more severe lesions than did chickens, and lesions were more pronounced in turkeys at 112 days of age.

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